Windows Tips & Tricks UPDATE--November 29, 2004

Windows Tips &amp Tricks UPDATE, November 29, 2004, —brought to you by the Windows IT Pro Network and the Windows 2000 FAQ site
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FAQs

  • Q. How can I check the mode of a server that's running Windows Server 2003 Terminal Services or Windows 2000 Server Terminal Services?
  • Q. How can I quickly obtain a list of the domain controllers (DCs) in my Active Directory (AD) domain?
  • Q. How can I use a script to uninstall a service pack?
  • Q. My client machines have the default administrative shares disabled, but now Microsoft Operations Manager (MOM) and Microsoft Systems Management Server (SMS) aren't working correctly. Can you explain why?
  • Q. How can I use Group Policy to control whether the default administrative shares are created?

Commentary
by John Savill, FAQ Editor, [email protected]

This week, I tell you how to check the mode of a server that's running Windows Server 2003 Terminal Services or Windows 2000 Server Terminal Services, how to quickly obtain a list of the domain controllers (DCs) in an Active Directory (AD) domain, and how to use a script to uninstall a service pack. I also explain why Microsoft Operations Manager (MOM) and Microsoft Systems Management Server (SMS) don't work correctly when the default administrative shares are disabled on client systems and how you can use Group Policy to control whether the default administrative shares are created.


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FAQs

Q. How can I check the mode of a server that's running Windows Server 2003 Terminal Services or Windows 2000 Server Terminal Services?

A. Terminal Services in Windows 2003 and Win2K Server has two modes: Remote Administration mode (known as Remote Desktop for Administration in Windows 2003) and Application mode (known as Terminal Server mode in Windows 2003). Although you can toggle between these modes, doing so will affect the installed applications and will probably cause currently installed programs to be reinstalled.

To determine the mode in which a server is currently running, perform these steps:

  1. Start the Microsoft Management Console (MMC) Terminal Services Configuration snap-in (Start, Programs, Administrative Tools, Terminal Services Configuration).
  2. Select the Server Options branch in the snap-in's left pane.
  3. The configuration options are displayed in the right pane. Take note of the values: Licensing (for a Windows 2003 system) or Terminal Server Mode (for a Win2K Server system).
  4. Close the snap-in.

If the Licensing or Terminal Server Mode value is Remote Desktop for Administration or Remote Administration, you're limited to two connections (plus a local console in Windows 2003) when you're in Remote Administration mode. If the Licensing or Terminal Server Mode value is Application or Terminal Server, you're in Application mode and in that mode can have multiple concurrent connections, depending on the number of existing licenses.

Q. How can I quickly obtain a list of the domain controllers (DCs) in my Active Directory (AD) domain?

A. You can output a list of all DCs in a domain by running the Nltest command (which is included in the Support Tools) and specifying the /dclist parameter. The following sample command generates a list of all DCs in the savilltech.com domain:

nltest /dclist:savilltech.com

Q. How can I use a script to uninstall a service pack?

A. One of my clients recently had to remove Windows XP Service Pack 2 (SP2) from a system on which it had been accidentally deployed. You can use the following script, Removesp.vbs (which a friend gave me and I modified a bit), to silently remove the service pack (in this case, XP SP2) and reboot the computer. (You can download the script at http://www.windowsitpro.com/content/content/44632/removesp_vbs.zip. After you extract the script, save it as removesp.vbs.)

strComputer = "."

Set WshShell = WScript.CreateObject("WScript.Shell")

Set objWMIService =
GetObject("winmgmts:\{impersonationLevel=impersonate\}!\\" & strComputer
& "\root\cimv2")

Set colOperatingSystems = objWMIService.ExecQuery("Select * from
Win32_OperatingSystem")

For Each objOperatingSystem in colOperatingSystems

    If objOperatingSystem.ServicePackMajorVersion = "2" Then

        WshShell.Run
"%windir%\$NtServicePackUninstall$\spuninst\spuninst.exe -u -f", 1,
True
        WshShell.Run "%windir%\system32\shutdown.exe -r -f -t 5 -c " &
chr(34) & "Service Pack 2 has been uninstalled from your computer. The
computer will now be restarted." & chr(34)

    End If

Next

You can call Removesp.vbs from a standard logon script by using a line of code similar to this:

wscript \\domain\netlogon\script.vbs

You might want to customize the script so that it also checks for the current OS version. As is, Removesp.vbs uninstalls SP2 on any OS for which an SP2 exists. You can use the objOperatingSystem.Version attribute to return a value that identifies the OS. Some common values include

  • 5.0.2195: Windows 2000 Server
  • 5.1.2600: XP
  • 5.2.3790: Windows 2003

For example, to check for the existence of SP2 on only XP systems, you'd change the conditional statement

If objOperatingSystem.ServicePackMajorVersion = "2" Then

to this:

If objOperatingSystem.ServicePackMajorVersion = "2" and
objOperatingSystem.Version = "5.1.2600" Then

Q. My client machines have the default administrative shares disabled, but now Microsoft Operations Manager (MOM) and Microsoft Systems Management Server (SMS) aren't working correctly. Can you explain why?

A. The default administrative shares (e.g., C$, D$) must be enabled so that MOM and SMS can function; the applications won't work correctly if these default shares are disabled on clients. To solve your problem, you must enable the default shares on your client systems. For more information about how to configure the creation of the default administrative shares, see the FAQ "How do I stop the default admin shares from being created?"--which provides the registry values you can set to either enable or disable the default administrative shares--at http://www.windowsitpro.com/articles/index.cfm?articleid=14437.

Q. How can I use Group Policy to control whether the default administrative shares are created?

A. In Windows NT system policies, you could control creation of the default administrative shares (e.g., C$, D$) by using a policy setting. However, because Microsoft changed how Windows 2000 and later apply policies, you can't use Group Policy to control default administrative share creation. One method for enabling the default administrative shares for all Win2K and later machines is to create a registry file that contains the settings to enable the default administrative shares to run from a logon script.

Another way to use Group Policy settings to control creation of default administrative shares is to create a custom Administrative Template (.adm) file, which you can copy into your Group Policy Objects (GPOs) and which enables the setting of the registry values. The following sample .adm file, which my colleague Tim Goodrich created, creates a GPO that modifies certain registry settings, which control the creation of default administrative shares.

CLASS MACHINE

CATEGORY !!DefaultShares

 POLICY !!DefaultSharesWKS
    EXPLAIN !!EnableDefaultShares_Explain
    VALUENAME "AutoShareWks"
    VALUEON NUMERIC 1
            VALUEOFF NUMERIC 0
    KEYNAME "SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\lanmanserver\parameters"
 END POLICY

 POLICY !!DefaultSharesSRV    
    EXPLAIN !!EnableDefaultShares_Explain
    VALUENAME "AutoShareServer"
    VALUEON NUMERIC 1
            VALUEOFF NUMERIC 0
    KEYNAME "SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\lanmanserver\parameters"
 END POLICY

END CATEGORY

\[strings\]
DefaultSharesWKS="Default Workstation Admin Shares"
DefaultSharesSRV="Default Server Admin Shares"
EnableDefaultShares_Explain="Enables default Admin shares"
DefaultShares="Default Shares"

Be aware that this .adm file modifies registry keys that are outside of regular policy areas. Thus, even when you delete this GPO by using the Microsoft Management Console (MMC) Users and Computers snap-in, the registry change will remain in effect permanently.

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