Windows & .NET Magazine UPDATE, January 7, 2003

Windows & .NET Magazine UPDATE—brought to you by Windows & .NET Magazine, the leading publication for IT professionals deploying Windows and related technologies.
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(below COMMENTARY)


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January 7, 2003—In this issue:

1. COMMENTARY

  • 2003 Begins with the End of NT 4.0 and Win95 Support

2. HOT OFF THE PRESS

  • Microsoft Names Titanium, Releases Beta 2

3. KEEPING UP WITH WIN2K AND NT

  • New Security Hotfixes

4. ANNOUNCEMENT

  • The Microsoft Mobility Tour Is Coming Soon to a City Near You!
  • Get "The Windows XP/2000 Answer Book"

5. INSTANT POLL

  • Results of Previous Poll: Microsoft .NET Framework
  • New Instant Poll: NT Server 4.0

6. RESOURCES

  • Featured Thread: Using XP Pro as a Router Between Subnets
  • FAQ: How Can I Connect the Microsoft Outlook 2002 Client to an IBM Lotus Domino R5 Server?

7. NEW AND IMPROVED

  • Manage Security Policies
  • Back Up Your Tablet PC Device
  • Submit Top Product Ideas

8. CONTACT US

  • See this section for a list of ways to contact us.

1. COMMENTARY
(contributed by Paul Thurrott, News Editor, [email protected])

  • 2003 BEGINS WITH THE END OF NT 4.0 AND WIN95 SUPPORT

  • With the inevitable progress of the calendar, we now face the first year without support for Windows NT 4.0 and Windows 95, two milestone products that placed Microsoft at the forefront of server and desktop OS dominance. Microsoft retired mainstream support for NT 4.0 on December 31, 2002, effectively abandoning more than 4 million NT Server 4.0 and 10 million NT Workstation 4.0 machines in active use, unless IT decision makers choose to pay for continued support. For the more than 100 million Win95 users, the situation is even more grim: On December 31, Win95 (and all Windows 3x products) reached what Microsoft calls End Of Life (EOL) status, which means no more support—even for customers who would pay extra for it—and no more patches or security updates.

    To conspiracy-minded users, news of NT's and Win95's support situations signal that Microsoft is trying to force users to upgrade to new products such as Windows .NET Server (Win.NET Server) 2003 and Windows XP. But both NT and Win95 are more than 6 years old—an eon in the computer industry. When Microsoft first released Win95, for example, 16-bit software ruled the desktop, IBM's OS/2 was a viable desktop alternative, Novell NetWare dominated the server space, and Linux was in an embryonic state, generally distributed on floppy disk. Much has changed since then, and if the endless cavalcade of Windows desktop and server releases since 1996 hasn't caused users to upgrade, Win.NET Server or XP are unlikely to do so either: Computers and the software systems that drive them are more resilient and long-lasting than ever before, despite complaints to the contrary.

    So what are your options? If you still run NT on desktops or laptops, Microsoft offers XP Professional Edition and Win2K Professional. Both products offer advanced power management and offline capabilities, support for new hardware, Active Directory (AD) integration, and various other technologies that were only a gleam in some engineer's eye when NT shipped in mid-1996. Although I understand why some corporations continue using NT on the server for various reasons—especially in small organizations in which NT just works and no business reason to upgrade exists—I have little patience for people who still run NT on desktop and laptop systems. My advice now, as it was when Win2K first shipped, is to upgrade your workforce to Win2K (or XP) before you upgrade any servers. Either OS will make people more productive, through longer battery life; more seamless integration with back-end services, networks, and the Internet; and better stability. And modern desktop hardware is relatively inexpensive.

    On the server side, however, my advice varies depending on the situation. As I noted before, if NT Server 4.0 works, and you foresee no demand for features that are unique to Win.NET Server or Win2K Server, you have little reason to upgrade. In many cases, deciding whether to upgrade comes down to cost. If you choose to remain with NT Server 4.0, you can pay for Microsoft support in various ways, including per-incident charges and Premier support. Other support options are also available (see link below). If you want to upgrade to Win.NET Server or Win2K Server, you probably need to buy new server hardware, especially if you still use 1996-era Pentium Pro boxes or similar. So that's another cost to consider.

    Another factor driving server upgrades is the various server products that Microsoft and other companies provide. Products such as Microsoft Exchange Server 2003 (formerly code-named Titanium) won't run on NT Server 4.0, and if you foresee upgrading to such a product, you need to start planning a Win.NET Server or Win2K Server migration. Win.NET Server, incidentally, will ship in April 2003. Because of Win.NET Server's better NT migration capabilities, NT holdouts might consider waiting for this release. Win2K Server users, however, should upgrade only if they need a Win.NET Server-specific feature or if they can take advantage of the out-of-the-box performance boost that this new system provides. (I'll be discussing various Win.NET Server features and technologies throughout 2003 in Windows & .NET Magazine UPDATE.)

    The case today for Win95 is as feeble as the underpinnings of that DOS-based system. Win95 is unstable, unreliable, and insecure compared with modern desktop systems such as XP Pro and Win2K, and unless your organization is so cash-strapped that it must force workers to use 1996-era hardware, Win95 offers precious reason to stay. More damning, of course, is Win95's EOL status: Because Microsoft won't support Win95 with future security fixes, this system will become more dangerous over time. My recommendation is to drop Win95 as soon as possible.

    Regardless of your thoughts about the support situation for these products, one thing NT and Win95 users clearly value is longevity, and you might be interested to know that Microsoft's previous breakneck upgrade cycle for OSs is ending. Rather than follow XP with an XP Second Edition in 2003, Microsoft is taking its time delivering its next-generation desktop OS, code-named Longhorn. According to various people at the company, Longhorn won't ship until late 2004 at the earliest, meaning that your XP investment will last even longer than usual. Microsoft is taking the same approach with Win.NET Server—the company has no plans for a Longhorn-era server release. Instead, Microsoft will develop the next Windows server OS, code-named Blackcomb, separately from Longhorn and will ship the OS at least 1 year later. I doubt I'm alone in cheering these decisions: Windows is a mature product now, and Microsoft has little reason to impose confusing upgrades on users every year.

    Related Links

    "Windows Desktop Product Life Cycle Support and Availability Policies for Businesses"
    "Retiring Windows NT Server 4.0: Changes in Product Availability and Support"


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    2. HOT OFF THE PRESS
    (contributed by Paul Thurrott, [email protected])

  • MICROSOFT NAMES TITANIUM, RELEASES BETA 2

  • Microsoft will market the next version of Microsoft Exchange Server (code-named Titanium) as Exchange Server 2003 when it releases the product later this year. The second beta of the long-awaited upgrade to the company's best-selling messaging and personal information manager (PIM) server product, Exchange 2003 beta 2 is now also available to the public through a free download or a CD-ROM order. Microsoft is already deploying Exchange 2003 beta 2 internally and at dozens of the company's partners' sites. To read the complete story, visit the following URL:
    http://www.wininformant.com/articles/index.cfm?articleid=37549

    3. KEEPING UP WITH WIN2K AND NT
    (contributed by Paula Sharick, [email protected])

  • NEW SECURITY HOTFIXES

  • Microsoft released two important security hotfixes during the last 2 weeks of December. If you don't use Windows XP's Automatic Update feature to apply hotfixes, you should manually install the hotfix that eliminates an unchecked buffer vulnerability that might let a malicious user run code locally with the rights of the locally logged-on user. All sites should install the latest Virtual Machine (VM) hotfix on all Windows platforms. The latest VM version, 3809, eliminates eight newly discovered flaws, several of which can have severe consequences. To find more about these recent hotfixes, visit the following URL:
    http://www.winnetmag.com/articles/index.cfm?articleid=37574

    4. ANNOUNCEMENTS
    (brought to you by Windows & .NET Magazine and its partners)

  • THE MICROSOFT MOBILITY TOUR IS COMING SOON TO A CITY NEAR YOU!

  • This outstanding seven-city event will help support your growing mobile workforce. Industry guru Paul Thurrott discusses the coolest mobility hardware solutions around, demonstrates how to increase the productivity of your "road warriors" with the unique features of Windows XP and Office XP, and much more. You could also win an HP iPAQ Pocket PC. There is no charge for these live events, but space is limited so register today! Sponsored by Microsoft, HP, and Toshiba.
    http://www.winnetmag.com/seminars/mobility

  • GET "THE WINDOWS XP/2000 ANSWER BOOK"

  • "The Windows XP/2000 Answer Book," by John Savill, answers more than 1000 FAQs about the latest and most powerful versions of Windows. You'll discover key information about installation, customization, Active Directory, Internet support, security, and much more. Amazon.com readers give it five stars, so get your copy today!
    http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/asin/0321113578/windnetmaga-20

    5. INSTANT POLL

  • RESULTS OF PREVIOUS POLL: MICROSOFT .NET FRAMEWORK

  • The voting has closed in Windows & .NET Magazine's nonscientific Instant Poll for the question, "Will your enterprise implement the Microsoft .NET Framework in 2003?" Here are the results from the 302 votes.
    • 11% We've already implemented the .NET Framework
    • 13% Yes, we plan to implement the .NET Framework in 2003
    • 73% No, we have no plans to implement the .NET Framework
    • 2% I don't know

    (Deviations from 100 percent are due to rounding error.)

  • NEW INSTANT POLL: NT SERVER 4.0

  • The next Instant Poll question is, "Does your company still use Windows NT Server 4.0 as its enterprise server system?" Go to the Windows & .NET Magazine home page and submit your vote for a) Yes, b) Yes, but we plan to upgrade in 2003, c) No, we don't use NT.
    http://www.winnetmag.com/magazine

    6. RESOURCES

  • FEATURED THREAD: USING XP PRO AS A ROUTER BETWEEN SUBNETS

  • Andrew wants to know whether he can use a Windows XP Professional Edition machine as a router between subnets rather than using the Bridge Wizard. If you can help, join the discussion at the following URL:
    http://www.winnetmag.com/forums/rd.cfm?cid=36&tid=51863

  • FAQ: HOW CAN I CONNECT THE MICROSOFT OUTLOOK 2002 CLIENT TO AN IBM LOTUS DOMINO R5 SERVER?

  • ( contributed by John Savill, http://www.windows2000faq.com )

    Microsoft has released an add-in that lets the Outlook 2002 client access a Domino R5 server. You can download the add-in for no charge at the URL below. The add-in has some limitations, which the download page explains.
    http://www.microsoft.com/office/ork/xp/journ/outxpcon.htm

    7. NEW AND IMPROVED
    (contributed by Carolyn Mader, [email protected])

  • MANAGE SECURITY POLICIES

  • BindView announced the launch of a new product line, the BindView Policy Center, and the release of the first product within that suite, Policy Operations Center. BindView Policy Center provides integrated policy-development tools and policy-tracking features. Policy Operations Center is a Web-based system that lets you develop, implement, and manage security policies. Policy Operations Center is a Web-hosted service with an annual subscription rate that starts at $35,000 per year. Contact BindView at 713-561-4000 or 800-749-8439.
    http://www.bindview.com

  • BACK UP YOUR TABLET PC DEVICE

  • CMS Peripherals announced that its ABSplus Automatic Backup System is compatible with Tablet PC devices. ABSplus, a hardware and software solution, provides complete backup, restore, and disaster-recovery capabilities in a bootable and removable hard disk form. The pocket-sized, Plug and Play (PnP) devices can back up the entire Tablet PC hard disk. ABSplus is available in three standard interface configurations: USB 2.0, FireWire, and PC Card. The device can back up in capacities that range from 20GB to 60GB. Pricing starts at $299. Contact CMS Peripherals at 714-424-5520 or 800-327-5773.
    http://www.cmsproducts.com

  • SUBMIT TOP PRODUCT IDEAS

  • Have you used a product that changed your IT experience by saving you time or easing your daily burden? Do you know of a terrific product that others should know about? Tell us! We want to write about the product in a future Windows & .NET Magazine What's Hot column. Send your product suggestions to [email protected]

    8. CONTACT US
    Here's how to reach us with your comments and questions:

    (please mention the newsletter name in the subject line)

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