How can I determine whether a Dfs root is a standalone root or a fault-tolerant (Active Directory--AD-stored) root?

A. If the Dfs root address is \\<domain name>\<share&lg;, it's probably an AD-stored Dfs root. However, to be certain, open the Microsoft Management Console (MMC) Dfs snap-in, and in the left pane you'll see an icon next to the name of the root, as the figure shows. If the icon shows two servers, it's a fault-tolerant root, which stores its information in AD. If the icon shows a single server, it's a stand-alone root.

You can also determine the root type by using the dfsutil command and specifying the name of the root with the /view parameter. The first output shows a domain root; the second shows a stand-alone root.

C:\>dfsutil /root:\\ztdemo.test\shared /view

Microsoft(R) Windows(TM) Dfs Utility Version 4.0
Copyright (C) Microsoft Corporation 1991-2001. All Rights Reserved.
Domain Root with 6 Links \[Blob Size: 2474 bytes\]

C:\>dfsutil /root:\\vsztisrv01\noftshare /view

Microsoft(R) Windows(TM) Dfs Utility Version 4.0
Copyright (C) Microsoft Corporation 1991-2001. All Rights Reserved.
Standalone Root with 3 Links
TAGS: Windows 8
Hide comments

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Publish