CertTutor.net UPDATE, January 17, 2003

CertTutor.net UPDATE—brought to you by the Windows & .NET Magazine Network and CertTutor.net
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January 17, 2003—In this issue:

1. COMMENTARY

  • When Bad Things Happen to Good Systems Engineers

2. NEWS & VIEWS

  • IBM Consolidates Certification Offerings
  • New Microsoft Security Exam Goes Live

3. ANNOUNCEMENTS

  • Windows Scripting Solutions for the Systems Administrator
  • Back by Popular Demand—Don't Miss Our Security Road Show Event!

4. WHAT'S NEW FROM CERTTUTOR LIVE!

  • Featured Threads:
    • Which Exchange Exam?
    • Permissions
    • Ramping Up on .Net
    • Hot Threads:
      • Tax Software Beware of Activation
      • Am I Ready for 70-210?
      • PC vs. Laptop

    5. RESOURCES

    • Link of the Week: Windows Scripting Solutions
    • Tip of the Week: Getting Help
    • Question of the Week: 70-215

    6. INSTANT POLL

    • Results of the Previous Poll: What's in a Name?
    • New Poll: When Disaster Strikes?

    7. NEW AND IMPROVED

    • Learn More About Windows XP and Win2K

    8. CONTACT US

    • See this section for a list of ways to contact us.

    1. COMMENTARY
    (contributed by Dick Lewis, [email protected])

  • WHEN BAD THINGS HAPPEN TO GOOD SYSTEMS ENGINEERS

  • Your training-center instructor never told you about days like this. You're overseeing a large server upgrade, and all your preparatory work is finished. You have a detailed task list, a solid back-out plan, good data backups, hardware vendor support, and management approval. However, the bottom drops out when your servers suddenly fail. All hopes of any upgrade are gone. At this point, your lofty goal is to just get back to your original configuration. You work through the weekend trying to get your systems back online in time for the next business day, but as employees start to arrive, they discover that their email and main file servers are nowhere to be found. You finally get things back online, but not without significant productivity losses in the user community. Despite your most careful preparations, you now find yourself in the hot seat, trying to justify your actions leading up to and following the meltdown. You start to think about updating your resume in case things don't go well when you meet with management.

    The meeting with management might be called a postmortem, a debriefing, or an inquisition. Depending on how serious the outage was and the size of your company, you might be facing your manager, several managers, or a committee that includes other technical people. Management will be intent on finding out what happened, how it happened, and what steps are necessary to prevent it from happening again. You've probably spent much of your training learning how to perform certain procedures successfully, but you must also learn how to react in the face of disaster. Perhaps your studies have given you the impression that if you click the right buttons, everything will go well. However, in the high-pressure environment of the data center, any mistakes or unforeseen problems can come back to haunt you.

    Before you embark on any significant project, remember the old adage that you should hope for the best and plan for the worst. Assemble an up-to-date contact list with phone numbers, cell phone numbers, or pager numbers of any managers you might need to contact in the event of an emergency. Document procedures for contacting users and clients to describe how any outage might affect their work. Determine who will communicate with the organization about any outages. Have contact information for your hardware and software vendors ready.

    As you work through a project, consider maintaining a list of the steps you take. This time line could prove invaluable if the event is a success and essential in the event of catastrophe. When you're putting out fires, your memory might fail you. But if you can provide a detailed time line during the postmortem, no one can accuse you of being evasive.

    During the meeting, try to answer management's questions honestly. Now is not the time to try to fool anyone. If you made any mistakes, admit them. If you can provide evidence that you acted logically, took all the proper steps, called in the proper resources, and informed management in a timely way, you'll probably survive this crisis. No one expects you to anticipate the unforeseeable.

    If you're a senior systems engineer, you might have to pose the tough questions to a colleague whose project went bad. Just remember that you were once in his or her shoes and that bad things can happen to good systems engineers. If you're in a management role, remember that the employees on the other side of the table are probably good at what they do. They might lack maturity, and they might need additional training, but if you support them in this difficult time, they'll work even harder for you. During one crisis I was involved in, our manager stepped in to tell us that she believed in us and knew we were trying our hardest to rectify the situation. Her demeanor was understanding, not confrontational. After that, she had our unequivocal support.

    2. NEWS & VIEWS

  • IBM CONSOLIDATES CERTIFICATION OFFERINGS

  • IBM announced a reorganization of its Professional Certification Program. The company nowplaces certifications into particular roles: IBM Certified Specialist, IBM Certified Solutions/Systems Expert, IBM Certified Advanced Technical Expert, IBM Certified Developer Associate, IBM Certified Developer, and Professional Instructor. For more information about these changes, visit the IBM Web site.
    http://www-1.ibm.com/certify/program/index.shtml

  • NEW MICROSOFT SECURITY EXAM GOES LIVE

  • Microsoft Exam 70-214: Implementing and Administering Security in a Microsoft Windows 2000 Network went live this week. You can schedule this MCSE elective exam through Prometric or VUE and take it in the next few days. For more information about this exam, visit the Microsoft Web site.
    http://www.microsoft.com/traincert/exams/70-214.asp

    3. ANNOUNCEMENTS
    (brought to you by Windows & .NET Magazine and its partners)

  • WINDOWS SCRIPTING SOLUTIONS FOR THE SYSTEMS ADMINISTRATOR

  • You might not be a programmer, but that doesn't mean you can't learn to create and deploy timesaving, problem-solving scripts. Discover Windows Scripting Solutions, the monthly print publication that helps you tackle common problems and automate everyday tasks with simple tools, tricks, and scripts. Try a sample issue today at
    http://www.winscriptingsolutions.com/rd.cfm?code=fsei262lup

  • BACK BY POPULAR DEMAND—DON'T MISS OUR SECURITY ROAD SHOW EVENT!

  • If you missed last year's popular security road show event, now is your chance to catch it again in Portland, Oregon, and Redmond. Learn from experts Mark Minasi and Paul Thurrott about how to shore up your system's security and what desktop security features are planned for Microsoft .NET and beyond. Registration is free, so sign up now!
    http://www.winnetmag.com/roadshows/security2003

    4. WHAT'S NEW FROM CERTTUTOR LIVE!

    CertTutor.net Live! is the Internet's number-one training and certification discussion board. Each week, CertTutor.net Live! receives thousands of posts about Windows XP, Windows 2000, Cisco Systems, and more. We've selected three of these posts to feature here in CertTutor.net UPDATE. To join in the conversation at CertTutor.net Live!, register at the following URL:
    http://www.certtutor.net/registration/index.cfm

  • FEATURED THREADS
  • WHICH EXCHANGE EXAM?

  • Beoweolf is considering Microsoft Exchange Server exams but isn't sure whether to take the Exchange 2000 Server exam or the Exchange Server 5.5 exam. See this thread to voice your opinion.
    http://certtutor.net/forums/messageview.cfm?catid=62&threadid=37230

  • PERMISSIONS

  • When preparing for the Microsoft workstation certification exams, you can't overlook the various permissions that pertain to file access. However, if you can answer the Question of the Day that this thread presents, you're in good shape.
    http://certtutor.net/forums/messageview.cfm?catid=14&threadid=37116

  • RAMPING UP ON .NET

  • If you're considering using virtual machine (VM) technology to try out Windows Server 2003 Release Candidate 2 (RC2), don't miss this thread.
    http://certtutor.net/forums/messageview.cfm?catid=10&threadid=37263

  • HOT THREADS
  • TAX SOFTWARE BEWARE OF ACTIVATION

  • http://certtutor.net/forums/messageview.cfm?catid=7&threadid=37038

  • AM I READY FOR 70-210?

  • http://certtutor.net/forums/messageview.cfm?catid=37&threadid=37280

  • PC VS. LAPTOP

  • http://certtutor.net/forums/messageview.cfm?catid=10&threadid=37256

    5. RESOURCES

  • LINK OF THE WEEK: WINDOWS SCRIPTING SOLUTIONS

  • Windows Scripting Solutions, which is part of the Windows & .NET Magazine Network, is full of great information about scripting—an area in which every systems administrator should be knowledgeable.
    http://www.winscriptingsolutions.com

  • TIP OF THE WEEK: GETTING HELP

  • An often overlooked but invaluable resource is the Help tool that ships with all Windows OSs. In fact, Windows XP's Help and Support Center includes not only the usual wealth of helpful information but also the Microsoft Knowledge Base. If you're connected to the Internet, Help and Support Center searches its own database, then accesses the Microsoft Web site and searches the entire Knowledge Base. By default, this search returns just 15 results, but you can click Options and change this value. The next time you're feeling stumped, turn to Help and Support Center first.

  • QUESTION OF THE WEEK: 70-215

  • This week's question will help you prepare for Exam 70-215: Installing, Configuring, and Administering Microsoft Windows 2000 Server.

    QUESTION
    You purchased a new file server with a 380GB hard disk

    for your company's 120 users, who work in four groups with distinct storage requirements:

    • The first group has 55 users who require up to 2.5GB of storage each.
    • The second group has 25 users who require up to 4GB of storage each.
    • The third group has 17 users who require up to 6GB of storage each.
    • The fourth group has 23 users who require up to 1.5GB of storage each.

    You want to use quotas to prevent users from exceeding group storage allocations. Which of the following schemes limits group members to particular storage quotas? (Choose all that apply.)

  1. Create one partition on the 380GB hard disk. Create shared folders called Alpha, Beta, Gamma, and Delta. Create local groups Group1, Group2, Group3, and Group4, then add users from the first group to Group1, users from the second group to Group2, users from the third group to Group3, and users from the fourth group to Group4. Open the properties for shared folder Alpha, select Quota, then specify 2.5GB. Grant NTFS permissions to Group1 only. Open the properties for shared folder Beta, select Quota, then specify 4GB. Grant NTFS permissions for this shared folder to Group2 only. Open the properties for shared folder Gamma, select Quota, then specify 6GB. Grant NTFS permissions for this shared folder to Group3 only. Open the properties for shared folder Delta, select Quota, then specify 1.5GB. Grant NTFS permissions for this shared folder to Group4 only.
  2. Create one partition on the 380GB hard disk. Create shared folders called Alpha, Beta, Gamma, and Delta. Create local groups Group1, Group2, Group3, and Group4, then add users from the first group to Group1, users from the second group to Group2, users from the third group to Group3, and users from the fourth group to Group4. Grant NTFS permissions for shared folder Alpha to Group1 only. Grant NTFS permissions for shared folder Beta to Group2 only. Grant NTFS permissions for shared folder Gamma to Group3 only. Grant NTFS permissions for shared folder Delta to Group4 only. Open the properties for the hard disk and click Quotas, Advanced. Create a Quota Entry for Group1 and assign a limit of 2.5GB. Repeat this final step for Group2, Group3, and Group4, assigning limits of 4GB, 6GB, and 1.5GB, respectively.
  3. Create one partition on the 380GB hard disk. Create shared folders called Alpha, Beta, Gamma, and Delta. Create local groups Group1, Group2, Group3, and Group4, then add users from the first group to Group1, users from the second group to Group2, users from the third group to Group3, and users from the fourth group to Group4. Grant NTFS and share permissions for shared folder Alpha to Group1 only. Grant NTFS and share permissions for shared folder Beta to Group2 only. Grant NTFS and share permissions for shared folder Gamma to Group3 only. Grant NTFS and share permissions for shared folder Delta to Group4 only. Open the properties for the hard disk, select the Quota tab, then click Quota Entries. Create a new quota entry and add each individual member of Group1, then set the quota and warning to 2.5GB. Repeat this final step for Group2, Group3, and Group4, setting the quota and warning values to 4GB, 6GB, and 1.5GB, respectively.
  4. Create four partitions on the 380GB hard disk: Partition Alpha (120GB), Partition Beta (100GB), Partition Gamma (100GB), and Partition Delta (60GB). Create a share on each partition. For the share on Partition Alpha, assign share and NTFS permissions to Group1. For the share on Partition Beta, assign share and NTFS permissions to Group2. For the share on Partition Gamma, assign share and NTFS permissions to Group3. For the share on Partition Delta, assign share and NTFS permissions to Group4. Open the properties for Partition Alpha, select the Quota tab, then set the quota to 2.5GB. Take the same steps for Partition Beta, Partition Gamma, and Partition Delta, setting the quota limits to 4GB, 6GB, and 1.5GB, respectively.
  5. Create four partitions on the 380GB hard disk: Partition Alpha (137.5GB), Partition Beta (100GB), Partition Gamma (102GB), and Partition Delta (34.5GB). Create a share on each partition. For the share on Partition Alpha, assign share and NTFS permissions to Group1. For the share on Partition Beta, assign share and NTFS permissions to Group2. For the share on Partition Gamma, assign share and NTFS permissions to Group3. For the share on Partition Delta, assign share and NTFS permissions to Group4. Open the properties for Partition Alpha, select the Quota tab, then set the quota to 2.5GB. Take the same steps for Partition Beta, Partition Gamma, and Partition Delta, setting the quota limits to 4GB, 6GB, and 1.5GB, respectively.
  6. None of the above.

ANSWER
The correct answers are C and E. The first group's 55 users require up to 2.5GB of storage each, or 137.5GB total. The second group's 25 users require up to 4GB of storage each, or 100GB total. The third group's 17 users require up to 6GB of storage each, or 102GB total. The fourth group's 23 users require up to 1.5GB of storage each, or 34.5GB total.

You can eliminate some of the possible answers quickly because they simply don't allocate enough space to each group. Next, consider that you can apply quotas to all users on a partition or to individual users, but not to groups.

6. INSTANT POLL

  • RESULTS OF PREVIOUS POLL: WHAT'S IN A NAME?

  • The voting has closed in the CertTutor.net nonscientific Instant Poll for the question, "What do you think of the new name for Microsoft's next server product, Windows Server 2003?" Here are the results from the 216 votes:
    • 44%: I love it!
    • 13%: It's OK.
    • 6%: I hate it!
    • 37%: I just wish Microsoft would make up its mind.

  • NEW POLL: WHEN DISASTER STRIKES

  • The next Instant Poll question is, "What was the cause of your most recent system failure?" Go to the CertTutor.net home page and submit your vote for a) Virus activity, b) Hardware failure, c) Software compatibility or driver problem, d) User error, or e) Who knows?
    http://www.certtutor.net

    7. NEW AND IMPROVED
    (contributed by Carolyn Mader, [email protected])

  • LEARN MORE ABOUT WINDOWS XP AND WIN2K

  • David Solomon Expert Seminars announced that Microsoft will license INSIDE Windows 2000 On Video for corporatewide training. The self-paced video courseware covers Windows XP and Windows 2000. The video course gives you access to 36 content-specific modules, more than 1000 explanatory graphics, 38 hands-on lab exercises, 168 interactive review questions, and a printed workbook. The course is available in two forms: five DVDs or two CD-ROMs. Contact David Solomon Expert Seminars at 800-492-4898.
    http://www.solsem.com

    8. CONTACT US
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    (please mention the newsletter name in the subject line)

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