Certifiable Q&A for March 1, 2002

Welcome to Certifiable, your exam prep headquarters. Here you'll find questions about some of the tricky areas that are fair game for the certification exams. Following the questions, you'll find the correct answers and explanatory text. We change the questions weekly.

Questions (March 1, 2002)
Answers (March 1, 2002)

This week's questions cover topics for Exam 70-210: Installing, Configuring, and Administering Microsoft Windows 200 Professional.

Questions (March 1, 2002)

Question 1
On your Windows 2000 Professional machine, you have one hard disk that has two simple volumes. The first volume, C, contains the OS and the boot files. The second volume, D, contains most of your data. The D volume is running out of space. You want to add some of your disk’s unpartitioned free space to the volume, but your attempts to do so have failed. What might explain why you've been unable to add free space to the D volume? (Choose all that apply.)

  1. The hard disk is a dynamic disk; you can't extend volumes on dynamic disks.
  2. The hard disk was initially a basic disk and you converted it to a dynamic disk after you created the volumes; you can extend only volumes that you create on dynamic disks.
  3. The D volume is your system partition; you can't extend the system partition.
  4. The D volume isn't NTFS formatted; you can extend a simple volume only if the file system is NTFS.

Question 2
Your Windows 2000 Professional laptop has three partitions (C, D, and E). You've formatted the C and D partitions with the NTFS file system and the E drive with the FAT file system. You have a folder named Data that contains 200MB of data. This folder and its contents are compressed. You want to move this folder from C to a folder on a different partition. However, you want the folder and its contents to remain compressed. Which of the following steps could you take? (Choose all that apply.)

  1. Copy the Graphics folder to a compressed folder on D named Data, and delete the original version of the folder on C.
  2. Move the Graphics folder to a compressed folder on D named Data.
  3. Move the Graphics folder to an uncompressed folder on D named Data.
  4. Copy the Graphics folder to an uncompressed folder on E named Data, and delete the original version of the folder on C.
  5. Move the Graphics folder to an uncompressed folder on E named Data.

Question 3
You're the administrator for a large Windows 2000 domain with a number of branch offices. At each site, one person is in charge of installing and configuring Windows 2000 Professional systems. You've edited a Group Policy Object (GPO) on the domain controllers (DCs) Organizational Unit (OU) to grant each of these individuals the user right Add Workstations to the Domain.

Fred, who's in charge of installing Win2K Pro systems in the Vancouver office, says that he added 10 computers to the domain but is now receiving an error message when he tries to add another computer. What should you do so that Fred (and the other people responsible for installing Win2K Pro) can continue to add as many workstations to the domain as needed? (Choose the best answer.)

  1. Increase the Relative Identifier (RID) pool on all domain controllers (DCs) in the domain.
  2. Grant the users the security privilege Create Computer Objects on the domain and remove the Add Workstation to the Domain user right.
  3. Edit the Default Domain Policy GPO to grant the users the Add Workstations to the Domain right.
  4. In addition to the Add Workstations to the Domain user right, grant these users the Logon as a Batch File user right.

Answers (March 1, 2002)

Answer to Question 1
The correct answers are B—The hard disk was initially a basic disk and you converted it to a dynamic disk after you created the volumes; you can extend only volumes that you create on dynamic disks; and D—The D volume isn't NTFS formatted; you can extend a simple volume only if the file system is NTFS.

You can extend only simple volumes that you’ve created on dynamic disks. If you try to extend a volumes on a basic disk that you've upgraded to dynamic, you'll receive the error message, "The selected volume was originally created on a basic disk and cannot be extended. Only volumes originally created on dynamic disks can be extended."

You can extend a simple volume only if that volume’s file system is NTFS. You can create a spanned volume, which is a simple volume that exists on more than one disk, that uses the FAT or NTFS file system. However, after you create a simple or spanned volume that uses the FAT file system, you can't extend or span it further.

In this question, the D volume isn't the system partition. The system partition is the partition that contains the boot files—in this case, the C drive.

For more information, see "Restrictions on Extending or Spanning Simple Volumes on Dynamic Disks" at the Microsoft Web site.

Answer to Question 2

The correct answer is A—Copy the Graphics folder to a compressed folder on D named Data, and delete the original version of the folder on C; or B—Move the Graphics folder to a compressed folder on D named Info, which is compressed. If you add or copy a file to a compressed folder, the system compresses it automatically. If you move a file to a compressed folder on a different NTFS drive, it’s also compressed. However, if you move a file to a compressed folder on the same NTFS drive, the file retains its original state, either compressed or uncompressed. Likewise, if you add or copy a file into an uncompressed folder, is the system uncompresses it automatically. If you move a file to an uncompressed folder on a different NTFS, it’s also uncompressed. However, if you move a file to an uncompressed folder on the same NTFS drive, the file retains its original state, either compressed or uncompressed.

Answer to Question 3
The correct answer is B—Grant the users the security privilege Create Computer Objects on the domain and remove the Add Workstation to the Domain user right. In Windows 2000, Microsoft further limited the Add Workstation to Domain right by adding a per-user quota, which is set to 10 computers by default. When users with the Add Workstation to Domain rights reach this limit, they can no longer add new computers to the domain. To let users add an unlimited number of computers to the domain, you must give them the Create Computer Objects right in Active Directory (AD). When the users have this right, they no longer require the Add Workstation to the Domain user right.

TAGS: Windows 8
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