WinInfo Daily UPDATE, November 24, 2003

This Issue Sponsored By

Argent Software
http://www.argent.com/products/download_whitepaper.cgi?product=mom&&Source=WNT

===============

1. In the News
- Congress Passes Antispam Bill
- Microsoft Settles with Tennessee
- Insecure? Linux Maker Suffers Electronic Attack

2. Announcements
- Quick Answers for Microsoft Small Business Server
- Are You Ready to Buy Hardware, Software, Networking Products, and Accessories?

3. Event
- New--Microsoft Security Road Show!

4. Contact Us
- See this section for a list of ways to contact us.

==== Sponsor: Argent Software ====

NETWORK TESTING LABS COMPARES MOM TO THE ARGENT GUARDIAN
Network Testing Labs, one of the world's leading independent research companies, put together a comprehensive Comparison Paper on two leading enterprise monitoring solutions. Their conclusion: "The Argent Guardian easily beats out MOM in all our tests ... The Argent Guardian will cost far less than MOM and yet provide significantly more functionality." Find out for yourself why organizations like Major League Baseball, GE Capital, AT&T, Harley Davidson, and Nokia all rely on The Argent Guardian for their enterprise monitoring and alerting needs. Download this Comparison Paper now:
http://www.argent.com/products/download_whitepaper.cgi?product=mom&&Source=WNT

==== 1. In the News ====
by Paul Thurrott, [email protected]

Congress Passes Antispam Bill
In a rare Saturday session, the US House of Representatives passed the first bill designed to protect US consumers from spam, paving the way for President George W. Bush to sign the bill into law by the end of the year. The bill, which passed by a 392 to 5 vote, mirrors the CAN-SPAM legislation that the US Senate approved last month by a vote of 97 to 0. If accepted as law, the bills will prohibit senders of unsolicited email from disguising their identities and harvesting email addresses from the Web, and require them to let recipients opt out of future mass mailings.
"Now we can go back to looking forward to opening our inboxes in the morning because we'll have notes from our friends rather than herbal supplements and mortgage offers," New Mexico Representative Heather Wilson said. Both bills authorize the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) to create a Do Not Spam list, similar to the controversial Do Not Call telephone list, that consumers will be able to sign up for to help ensure that they won't receive junk email.
Bill Gates, Microsoft chairman and chief software architect, issued a statement this weekend that lent his support to the House's passage of the antispam bill. "Today's passage of the antispam bill is a milestone in the battle against spam and a major step toward preserving email as a powerful communication tool," he said. "Microsoft applauds both houses of Congress for their efforts to get a strong bill to the president before the end of the year. This legislation is a critical component of the broader fight against spam and complements the industry's own antispam technologies. It will help consumers regain control of their inboxes and support email service providers in their battle to contain the spam menace. With this legislation, the spammers who deluge computer users with billions of unwanted email \[messages\] will face significant penalties for their illegal actions. Microsoft particularly supports the strong enforcement provisions and the ban on falsifying the origin of email solicitations and illegally obtaining lists of email addresses, both of which will help Internet service providers prosecute spammers. Spam ... costs businesses millions of dollars a year and can encroach on families and children, exposing them to pornographic or fraudulent content." Naturally, debates rage as to whether these bills can be combined into an effective, enforceable law. But, as some of the bills' supporters note, the bills are a good first step and represent an important change in federal protection of consumers and businesses against electronic attacks.

Microsoft Settles with Tennessee
This weekend, Microsoft agreed to pay $64 million to settle a set of antitrust-related class-action lawsuits in Tennessee, ending accusations that the company overcharged consumers in that state for Windows and other products. The deal is predictably similar to the many class-action lawsuit settlements Microsoft has made with consumers in other US states. The software giant will provide vouchers for any users who purchased Windows, Microsoft Office, Microsoft Word, or Microsoft Excel between December 21, 1995, and December 31, 2002. Users can apply the vouchers toward the purchase of any computer software or hardware.
"We're pleased by the opportunity to help schools all across Tennessee get the computers and software they need," said Brad Smith, Microsoft general counsel. "This settlement allows us to focus on the future and building great software and avoids the cost and uncertainty of litigation."
As with earlier settlements, Microsoft will pay the value of half of any unclaimed vouchers to the state's poorest schools. The Tennessee Commissioner of Education noted that the state will use those funds to purchase software, hardware, and services from Microsoft and other computer companies.

Insecure? Linux Maker Suffers Electronic Attack
Last week, an attacker compromised several key servers belonging to Linux distribution maker Debian Project, an event that seems to mirror problems Microsoft had 2 years ago when attackers compromised its network. The Debian incursion, however, was more dramatic: The project's bug-tracking, mail-list, Web server, and security-component servers were compromised. But in the aftermath of the attack, Debian officials said the code for its Linux distribution was unchanged.
"Fortunately, open-source developers tend to be very good at keeping cryptographic signatures on files and multiple backups to make sure that everything stays all right," Debian Cofounder Ian Murdoch told eWEEK. Murdoch claims that the attacker was really just interested in Debian's most recent Linux release, which is due this week. Arguably, the same might be said of the people who tried to attack Microsoft's network. Allegedly, those attackers were after the Windows source code, although Microsoft denies that they ever got that far.
Attacks on Microsoft servers tend to get a lot of press, but last week's attack on Debian isn't the first time this year that someone attacked an open-source stalwart's infrastructure. An intruder attacked Richard Stallman's Free Software Foundation (FSF) in March, although the attack wasn't discovered until months later. This time, at least, Debian quickly noticed the attack.
Most interesting to me, given the current security climate, is a comment Murdoch made about this kind of attack and the safety of open-source software (OSS). "This kind of attack is inevitable in open source," he noted. "The sad thing about the break-in is that it was probably done by an archetypical 15-year-old in a basement with nothing better to do." Debian Stable Release Manager Joey Schulze echoed this opinion. "You cannot eliminate all problems, unfortunately," he said. "Every GNU/Linux distribution is vulnerable, \[and\] even OpenBSD faces vulnerabilities, however \[it's\] quite seldom." And astonishingly, an IDC analyst actually called the break-in a "compliment," a platitude I'm pretty sure no one used during the Microsoft attack. "Someone felt that \[breaking into Debian's servers\] was hard enough to do to be worth doing," he said, apparently with no sense of irony or hypocrisy. "This is one more line of evidence that Linux is coming into the mainstream. The fact that it was caught and dealt with showed the strength of the \[OSS\] community." Does this double standard confuse and infuriate anyone else?

==== 2. Announcements ====
(from Windows & .NET Magazine and its partners)

Quick Answers for Microsoft Small Business Server
Is Small Business Server right for you? Do you need answers about how to set up Small Business Server? Learn about Small Business Server's key features, upgrade possibilities, and storage and find how-to guides, troubleshooting tips, forums, and more at Windows & .NET Magazine online.
http://www.winnetmag.com/smallbusinessserver

Are You Ready to Buy Hardware, Software, Networking Products, and Accessories?
Check out the latest offerings on the IT Buyer's Network. Find clearance items and rebates, research products in the solutions library, check out reference guides, and learn about the latest technology seminar. Easily search the most up-to-date products by category, and sign up to receive product information from the email newsletter.
http://www.itbuynet.com

==== 3. Event ====
(brought to you by Windows & .NET Magazine)

New--Microsoft Security Road Show!
Join industry guru Mark Minasi on this exciting 20-city tour and learn more about tips to secure your Windows Server 2003 and Windows 2000 network. There is no charge for this event, but space is limited, so register today! Sign up now for our December events.
http://www.winnetmag.com/roadshows/security2003dec

==== Sponsored Links ====

Sybari Software
Free! "Admins Shortcut Guide to Email Protection" from Sybari
http://ad.doubleclick.net/clk;6574227;8214395;q?http://www.sybari.com/ebook

VMware Inc.
FREE VMware Workstation for Microsoft Certified Trainers.
http://ad.doubleclick.net/clk;6602582;8214395;m?http://www.vmware.com/wl/offer/486/0

=========

==== 4. Contact Us ==== >

About the newsletter -- [email protected]
About technical questions -- http://www.winnetmag.com/forums
About product news -- [email protected]
About your subscription -- [email protected]
About sponsoring UPDATE -- [email protected]

==========

This email newsletter is brought to you by Windows & .NET Magazine, the leading publication for IT professionals deploying Windows and related technologies. Subscribe today.
http://www.winnetmag.com/sub.cfm?code=wswi201x1z

Manage Your Account You are subscribed as #EmailAddr#.
To unsubscribe from this email newsletter, send an email message to mailto:#mailing:unsubemail#.

To make other changes to your email account such as change your email address, update your profile, and subscribe or unsubscribe to any of our email newsletters, simply log on to our Email Preference Center.
http://www.winnetmag.com/email

Copyright 2003, Penton Media, Inc.

==== This Issue Sponsored By ====

Argent Software http://www.argent.com/products/download_whitepaper.cgi?product=mom&&Source=WNT

==========

1. In the News - Congress Passes Antispam Bill - Microsoft Settles with Tennessee - Insecure? Linux Maker Suffers Electronic Attack

2. Announcements - Quick Answers for Microsoft Small Business Server - Are You Ready to Buy Hardware, Software, Networking Products, and Accessories?

3. Event - New--Microsoft Security Road Show!

4. Contact Us - See this section for a list of ways to contact us.

==== Sponsor: Argent Software ==== NETWORK TESTING LABS COMPARES MOM TO THE ARGENT GUARDIAN Network Testing Labs, one of the world's leading independent research companies, put together a comprehensive Comparison Paper on two leading enterprise monitoring solutions. Their conclusion: "The Argent Guardian easily beats out MOM in all our tests ... The Argent Guardian will cost far less than MOM and yet provide significantly more functionality." Find out for yourself why organizations like Major League Baseball, GE Capital, AT&T, Harley Davidson, and Nokia all rely on The Argent Guardian for their enterprise monitoring and alerting needs. Download this Comparison Paper now: http://www.argent.com/products/download_whitepaper.cgi?product=mom&&Source=WNT

==== 1. In the News ==== by Paul Thurrott, [email protected]

Congress Passes Antispam Bill In a rare Saturday session, the US House of Representatives passed the first bill designed to protect US consumers from spam, paving the way for President George W. Bush to sign the bill into law by the end of the year. The bill, which passed by a 392 to 5 vote, mirrors the CAN-SPAM legislation that the US Senate approved last month by a vote of 97 to 0. If accepted as law, the bills will prohibit senders of unsolicited email from disguising their identities and harvesting email addresses from the Web, and require them to let recipients opt out of future mass mailings. "Now we can go back to looking forward to opening our inboxes in the morning because we'll have notes from our friends rather than herbal supplements and mortgage offers," New Mexico Representative Heather Wilson said. Both bills authorize the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) to create a Do Not Spam list, similar to the controversial Do Not Call telephone list, that consumers will be able to sign up for to help ensure that they won't receive junk email. Bill Gates, Microsoft chairman and chief software architect, issued a statement this weekend that lent his support to the House's passage of the antispam bill. "Today's passage of the antispam bill is a milestone in the battle against spam and a major step toward preserving email as a powerful communication tool," he said. "Microsoft applauds both houses of Congress for their efforts to get a strong bill to the president before the end of the year. This legislation is a critical component of the broader fight against spam and complements the industry's own antispam technologies. It will help consumers regain control of their inboxes and support email service providers in their battle to contain the spam menace. With this legislation, the spammers who deluge computer users with billions of unwanted email \[messages\] will face significant penalties for their illegal actions. Microsoft particularly supports the strong enforcement provisions and the ban on falsifying the origin of email solicitations and illegally obtaining lists of email addresses, both of which will help Internet service providers prosecute spammers. Spam ... costs businesses millions of dollars a year and can encroach on families and children, exposing them to pornographic or fraudulent content." Naturally, debates rage as to whether these bills can be combined into an effective, enforceable law. But, as some of the bills' supporters note, the bills are a good first step and represent an important change in federal protection of consumers and businesses against electronic attacks.

Microsoft Settles with Tennessee This weekend, Microsoft agreed to pay $64 million to settle a set of antitrust-related class-action lawsuits in Tennessee, ending accusations that the company overcharged consumers in that state for Windows and other products. The deal is predictably similar to the many class-action lawsuit settlements Microsoft has made with consumers in other US states. The software giant will provide vouchers for any users who purchased Windows, Microsoft Office, Microsoft Word, or Microsoft Excel between December 21, 1995, and December 31, 2002. Users can apply the vouchers toward the purchase of any computer software or hardware. "We're pleased by the opportunity to help schools all across Tennessee get the computers and software they need," said Brad Smith, Microsoft general counsel. "This settlement allows us to focus on the future and building great software and avoids the cost and uncertainty of litigation." As with earlier settlements, Microsoft will pay the value of half of any unclaimed vouchers to the state's poorest schools. The Tennessee Commissioner of Education noted that the state will use those funds to purchase software, hardware, and services from Microsoft and other computer companies.

Insecure? Linux Maker Suffers Electronic Attack Last week, an attacker compromised several key servers belonging to Linux distribution maker Debian Project, an event that seems to mirror problems Microsoft had 2 years ago when attackers compromised its network. The Debian incursion, however, was more dramatic: The project's bug-tracking, mail-list, Web server, and security-component servers were compromised. But in the aftermath of the attack, Debian officials said the code for its Linux distribution was unchanged. "Fortunately, open-source developers tend to be very good at keeping cryptographic signatures on files and multiple backups to make sure that everything stays all right," Debian Cofounder Ian Murdoch told eWEEK. Murdoch claims that the attacker was really just interested in Debian's most recent Linux release, which is due this week. Arguably, the same might be said of the people who tried to attack Microsoft's network. Allegedly, those attackers were after the Windows source code, although Microsoft denies that they ever got that far. Attacks on Microsoft servers tend to get a lot of press, but last week's attack on Debian isn't the first time this year that someone attacked an open-source stalwart's infrastructure. An intruder attacked Richard Stallman's Free Software Foundation (FSF) in March, although the attack wasn't discovered until months later. This time, at least, Debian quickly noticed the attack. Most interesting to me, given the current security climate, is a comment Murdoch made about this kind of attack and the safety of open-source software (OSS). "This kind of attack is inevitable in open source," he noted. "The sad thing about the break-in is that it was probably done by an archetypical 15-year-old in a basement with nothing better to do." Debian Stable Release Manager Joey Schulze echoed this opinion. "You cannot eliminate all problems, unfortunately," he said. "Every GNU/Linux distribution is vulnerable, \[and\] even OpenBSD faces vulnerabilities, however \[it's\] quite seldom." And astonishingly, an IDC analyst actually called the break-in a "compliment," a platitude I'm pretty sure no one used during the Microsoft attack. "Someone felt that \[breaking into Debian's servers\] was hard enough to do to be worth doing," he said, apparently with no sense of irony or hypocrisy. "This is one more line of evidence that Linux is coming into the mainstream. The fact that it was caught and dealt with showed the strength of the \[OSS\] community." Does this double standard confuse and infuriate anyone else?

==== 2. Announcements ==== (from Windows & .NET Magazine and its partners)

Quick Answers for Microsoft Small Business Server Is Small Business Server right for you? Do you need answers about how to set up Small Business Server? Learn about Small Business Server's key features, upgrade possibilities, and storage and find how-to guides, troubleshooting tips, forums, and more at Windows & .NET Magazine online. http://www.winnetmag.com/smallbusinessserver

Are You Ready to Buy Hardware, Software, Networking Products, and Accessories? Check out the latest offerings on the IT Buyer's Network. Find clearance items and rebates, research products in the solutions library, check out reference guides, and learn about the latest technology seminar. Easily search the most up-to-date products by category, and sign up to receive product information from the email newsletter. http://www.itbuynet.com

==== 3. Event ==== (brought to you by Windows & .NET Magazine)

New--Microsoft Security Road Show! Join industry guru Mark Minasi on this exciting 20-city tour and learn more about tips to secure your Windows Server 2003 and Windows 2000 network. There is no charge for this event, but space is limited, so register today! Sign up now for our December events. http://www.winnetmag.com/roadshows/security2003dec

==== Sponsored Links ====

Sybari Software Free! "Admins Shortcut Guide to Email Protection" from Sybari http://ad.doubleclick.net/clk;6574227;8214395;q?http://www.sybari.com/ebook

VMware Inc. FREE VMware Workstation for Microsoft Certified Trainers. http://ad.doubleclick.net/clk;6602582;8214395;m?http://www.vmware.com/wl/offer/486/0

=========

==== 4. Contact Us ====

About the newsletter -- [email protected] About technical questions -- http://www.winnetmag.com/forums About product news -- [email protected] About your subscription -- [email protected] About sponsoring UPDATE -- [email protected]

==========

This email newsletter is brought to you by Windows & .NET Magazine, the leading publication for IT professionals deploying Windows and related technologies. Subscribe today. http://www.winnetmag.com/sub.cfm?code=wswi201x1z

Manage Your Account You are subscribed as #EmailAddr#.

To unsubscribe from this email newsletter, send an email message to mailto:#mailing:unsubemail#.

To make other changes to your email account such as change your email address, update your profile, and subscribe or unsubscribe to any of our email newsletters, simply log on to our Email Preference Center. http://www.winnetmag.com/email

Copyright 2003, Penton Media, Inc.

==== This Issue Sponsored By ====

Argent Software http://www.argent.com/products/download_whitepaper.cgi?product=mom&&Source=WNT

==========

1. In the News - Congress Passes Antispam Bill - Microsoft Settles with Tennessee - Insecure? Linux Maker Suffers Electronic Attack

2. Announcements - Quick Answers for Microsoft Small Business Server - Are You Ready to Buy Hardware, Software, Networking Products, and Accessories?

3. Event - New--Microsoft Security Road Show!

4. Contact Us - See this section for a list of ways to contact us.

==== Sponsor: Argent Software ==== NETWORK TESTING LABS COMPARES MOM TO THE ARGENT GUARDIAN Network Testing Labs, one of the world's leading independent research companies, put together a comprehensive Comparison Paper on two leading enterprise monitoring solutions. Their conclusion: "The Argent Guardian easily beats out MOM in all our tests ... The Argent Guardian will cost far less than MOM and yet provide significantly more functionality." Find out for yourself why organizations like Major League Baseball, GE Capital, AT&T, Harley Davidson, and Nokia all rely on The Argent Guardian for their enterprise monitoring and alerting needs. Download this Comparison Paper now: http://www.argent.com/products/download_whitepaper.cgi?product=mom&&Source=WNT

==== 1. In the News ==== by Paul Thurrott, [email protected]

Congress Passes Antispam Bill In a rare Saturday session, the US House of Representatives passed the first bill designed to protect US consumers from spam, paving the way for President George W. Bush to sign the bill into law by the end of the year. The bill, which passed by a 392 to 5 vote, mirrors the CAN-SPAM legislation that the US Senate approved last month by a vote of 97 to 0. If accepted as law, the bills will prohibit senders of unsolicited email from disguising their identities and harvesting email addresses from the Web, and require them to let recipients opt out of future mass mailings. "Now we can go back to looking forward to opening our inboxes in the morning because we'll have notes from our friends rather than herbal supplements and mortgage offers," New Mexico Representative Heather Wilson said. Both bills authorize the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) to create a Do Not Spam list, similar to the controversial Do Not Call telephone list, that consumers will be able to sign up for to help ensure that they won't receive junk email. Bill Gates, Microsoft chairman and chief software architect, issued a statement this weekend that lent his support to the House's passage of the antispam bill. "Today's passage of the antispam bill is a milestone in the battle against spam and a major step toward preserving email as a powerful communication tool," he said. "Microsoft applauds both houses of Congress for their efforts to get a strong bill to the president before the end of the year. This legislation is a critical component of the broader fight against spam and complements the industry's own antispam technologies. It will help consumers regain control of their inboxes and support email service providers in their battle to contain the spam menace. With this legislation, the spammers who deluge computer users with billions of unwanted email \[messages\] will face significant penalties for their illegal actions. Microsoft particularly supports the strong enforcement provisions and the ban on falsifying the origin of email solicitations and illegally obtaining lists of email addresses, both of which will help Internet service providers prosecute spammers. Spam ... costs businesses millions of dollars a year and can encroach on families and children, exposing them to pornographic or fraudulent content." Naturally, debates rage as to whether these bills can be combined into an effective, enforceable law. But, as some of the bills' supporters note, the bills are a good first step and represent an important change in federal protection of consumers and businesses against electronic attacks.

Microsoft Settles with Tennessee This weekend, Microsoft agreed to pay $64 million to settle a set of antitrust-related class-action lawsuits in Tennessee, ending accusations that the company overcharged consumers in that state for Windows and other products. The deal is predictably similar to the many class-action lawsuit settlements Microsoft has made with consumers in other US states. The software giant will provide vouchers for any users who purchased Windows, Microsoft Office, Microsoft Word, or Microsoft Excel between December 21, 1995, and December 31, 2002. Users can apply the vouchers toward the purchase of any computer software or hardware. "We're pleased by the opportunity to help schools all across Tennessee get the computers and software they need," said Brad Smith, Microsoft general counsel. "This settlement allows us to focus on the future and building great software and avoids the cost and uncertainty of litigation." As with earlier settlements, Microsoft will pay the value of half of any unclaimed vouchers to the state's poorest schools. The Tennessee Commissioner of Education noted that the state will use those funds to purchase software, hardware, and services from Microsoft and other computer companies.

Insecure? Linux Maker Suffers Electronic Attack Last week, an attacker compromised several key servers belonging to Linux distribution maker Debian Project, an event that seems to mirror problems Microsoft had 2 years ago when attackers compromised its network. The Debian incursion, however, was more dramatic: The project's bug-tracking, mail-list, Web server, and security-component servers were compromised. But in the aftermath of the attack, Debian officials said the code for its Linux distribution was unchanged. "Fortunately, open-source developers tend to be very good at keeping cryptographic signatures on files and multiple backups to make sure that everything stays all right," Debian Cofounder Ian Murdoch told eWEEK. Murdoch claims that the attacker was really just interested in Debian's most recent Linux release, which is due this week. Arguably, the same might be said of the people who tried to attack Microsoft's network. Allegedly, those attackers were after the Windows source code, although Microsoft denies that they ever got that far. Attacks on Microsoft servers tend to get a lot of press, but last week's attack on Debian isn't the first time this year that someone attacked an open-source stalwart's infrastructure. An intruder attacked Richard Stallman's Free Software Foundation (FSF) in March, although the attack wasn't discovered until months later. This time, at least, Debian quickly noticed the attack. Most interesting to me, given the current security climate, is a comment Murdoch made about this kind of attack and the safety of open-source software (OSS). "This kind of attack is inevitable in open source," he noted. "The sad thing about the break-in is that it was probably done by an archetypical 15-year-old in a basement with nothing better to do." Debian Stable Release Manager Joey Schulze echoed this opinion. "You cannot eliminate all problems, unfortunately," he said. "Every GNU/Linux distribution is vulnerable, \[and\] even OpenBSD faces vulnerabilities, however \[it's\] quite seldom." And astonishingly, an IDC analyst actually called the break-in a "compliment," a platitude I'm pretty sure no one used during the Microsoft attack. "Someone felt that \[breaking into Debian's servers\] was hard enough to do to be worth doing," he said, apparently with no sense of irony or hypocrisy. "This is one more line of evidence that Linux is coming into the mainstream. The fact that it was caught and dealt with showed the strength of the \[OSS\] community." Does this double standard confuse and infuriate anyone else?

==== 2. Announcements ==== (from Windows & .NET Magazine and its partners)

Quick Answers for Microsoft Small Business Server Is Small Business Server right for you? Do you need answers about how to set up Small Business Server? Learn about Small Business Server's key features, upgrade possibilities, and storage and find how-to guides, troubleshooting tips, forums, and more at Windows & .NET Magazine online. http://www.winnetmag.com/smallbusinessserver

Are You Ready to Buy Hardware, Software, Networking Products, and Accessories? Check out the latest offerings on the IT Buyer's Network. Find clearance items and rebates, research products in the solutions library, check out reference guides, and learn about the latest technology seminar. Easily search the most up-to-date products by category, and sign up to receive product information from the email newsletter. http://www.itbuynet.com

==== 3. Event ==== (brought to you by Windows & .NET Magazine)

New--Microsoft Security Road Show! Join industry guru Mark Minasi on this exciting 20-city tour and learn more about tips to secure your Windows Server 2003 and Windows 2000 network. There is no charge for this event, but space is limited, so register today! Sign up now for our December events. http://www.winnetmag.com/roadshows/security2003dec

==== Sponsored Links ====

Sybari Software Free! "Admins Shortcut Guide to Email Protection" from Sybari http://ad.doubleclick.net/clk;6574227;8214395;q?http://www.sybari.com/ebook

VMware Inc. FREE VMware Workstation for Microsoft Certified Trainers. http://ad.doubleclick.net/clk;6602582;8214395;m?http://www.vmware.com/wl/offer/486/0

=========

==== 4. Contact Us ====

About the newsletter -- [email protected] About technical questions -- http://www.winnetmag.com/forums About product news -- [email protected] About your subscription -- [email protected] About sponsoring UPDATE -- [email protected]

===============

This email newsletter is brought to you by Windows & .NET Magazine, the leading publication for IT professionals deploying Windows and related technologies. Subscribe today. http://www.winnetmag.com/sub.cfm?code=wswi201x1z

Manage Your Account You are subscribed as #EmailAddr#.

To unsubscribe from this email newsletter, send an email message to mailto:#mailing:unsubemail#.

To make other changes to your email account such as change your email address, update your profile, and subscribe or unsubscribe to any of our email newsletters, simply log on to our Email Preference Center. http://www.winnetmag.com/email

Copyright 2003, Penton Media, Inc.

Hide comments

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Publish