PDC 2003 Aero Demo by Hillel Cooperman

 


Composite Aero desktop. This is a composite of two photographs, showing the very latest Aero concept. As
always, it's a work in progress. But this demo shows the latest direction Microsoft is taking with the new User Experience. Composite by Paul Thurrott.

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"Unleash power of Windows software and make user feel great."

"It's about love. The PC often makes people feel bad."

"We're good at making tools today. But what is the customer really going to do with your software? Sometimes it's not what you want them to do."
 

"We can use technology to be smart about slowly introducing functionality."

"This [concept is all about] thinking about the experience."

"This view, to be honest, is pretty simple .... not everything is exposed. If you want expose everything, there's a tradeoff."
 

"We're looking at a folder of these photos, and I click burn, right?"

"Well, sometimes, just do it. Please, just go burn these images to the disk. Why do you have to ask me any more questions?"

"But sometimes there are cases where I want to click each image, label them, sort them the way I want ... And our answer is, you gotta do both."
 

"We use high fidelity prototypes in UI design, to go and test our software. We believe that Avalon, as a platform for building UI, is going to be so flexible that over time we're going to be able to do more prototyping right there. This, however, has been prototyped in Director."

"This is an example of the People Picker in the Contacts dialog."

"Part of the platform we're building enables this. This is a common notification service ... We're having the system itself leverage this platform."
 

"We have the first one hundreds pages of a new set of User Experience Guidelines available now..."

"And a new thing, the Windows Application Cookbook, that walks you through the steps to build each of eight kinds of applications."
 
 
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