Developer .NET UPDATE, May 20, 2003

Developer .NET UPDATE—brought to you by the Windows & .NET Magazine Network

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This Issue Sponsored By

DevConnections Tour--The Conference Comes to You

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DevConnections--Fall 2003 Dates Announced

http://www.devconnections.com

May 20, 2003--In this issue:

1. Developer .NET Perspectives

  • Visual Studio .NET and Windows 2003 Features, Part 7

2. Announcements

  • Cast Your Vote in Our Annual Readers' Choice Awards!
  • Why Should You Register for SSMU E-Learning?

3. Event

  • Security 2003 Road Show

4. New and Improved

  • Simplify Your Code Generation

5. Contact Us

  • See this section for a list of ways to contact us.

Sponsor: DevConnections Tour--The Conference Comes to You

Can't make it to one of our major conferences? We will bring the conference to you. Join Paul Litwin and Carl Franklin for 2 days of solid, in-depth training in ASP.NET and VB .NET. Special keynote by Microsoft's Rob Howard.

Attend either the ASP or VB track for the entire two days or move from one track to the other as you desire. Don't miss this chance to get in-depth training from the experts in a highly interactive environment. Bring your questions and get the answers you need, plus discover new tips and insights.

Coming to a city near you. Get ready for the transition in development by learning from the best and keep your competitive edge.

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1. Developer .NET Perspectives

by Bill Sheldon, [email protected]

  • Visual Studio .NET and Windows 2003 Features, Part 7
  • Over the past several weeks, I've been discussing the new features of Visual Studio .NET 2003 and Windows Server 2003. I want to wrap up this series by discussing a few seemingly minor but significant updates: the new native data providers, changes to C++, and changes related to COM+ services in Windows 2003. These features might seem relatively minor to independent developers because the changes don't necessarily affect them. However, for corporate developers, these changes are the most significant updates in Microsoft's newly released products. This week, let's look at the new native data providers. Next week, I'll discuss the changes to C++ and COM+ services.

    Visual Studio .NET 2003's new data providers address a significant problem related to migrating existing enterprise applications to the Windows .NET Framework: connectivity to existing data sources. Enterprise applications often use proprietary data sources that are exposed through only one ODBC provider. As one of the earliest Windows standardizations, dating back to the Windows Open Services Architecture (WOSA) standards, ODBC still provides a much broader set of solutions for accessing legacy data sources (e.g., Microsoft Access). Unfortunately, Visual Studio .NET 2002 didn't support legacy data sources, which meant that upgrading the applications that referenced those data sources was problematic.

    In Visual Studio .NET 2003, the connectivity problem no longer exists. When working with legacy data sources, you can simply go to the System.Data namespace. This namespace includes an ODBC provider, which lets you use existing Data Source Name (DSN)-based connections to retrieve the data that's associated with existing applications. The addition of this new native data provider is important because one of the Framework's main goals is to improve the sharing of data. Not being able to access an entire class of data sources in Visual Studio .NET 2002 went against that goal.

    Besides shipping with the ODBC provider, Visual Studio .NET 2003 ships with a new Oracle provider. Unlike the ODBC provider, the Oracle provider isn't part of the default System.Data namespace. When you want to reference this provider, you must right-click the References link in Visual Studio .NET 2003's Solution Explorer window and add a new reference. From the list of available DLLs, you then select System.Data.OracleClient.dll. Through this DLL, you can reference the DataAdapter and DataConnection classes. Although the DataAdapter and DataConnection classes are specific to Oracle, you inherit them from the System.Data.Common namespace, which contains the parent classes for the SQLClient, SQLServerCE, and ODBC providers.

    The System.Data.Common namespace contains not only the parent classes for many data providers but also other common data-source classes. Because namespaces and inheritance are separate, the parent class System.Data.Common.DataAdapter can, for example, reside in the same namespace as System.Data.Common.DBDataAdapter. As a result, when you use the base class, make sure that you're inheriting from the true base class and that you're using overridable methods, as defined by the object browser.

    The new System.Data.Common and System.Data namespaces provide a way for developers to not only leverage existing data sources into .NET applications but also create new .NET applications that use multiple data sources. Thus, developers can use Visual Studio .NET 2003 to open connectivity among different stovepipe applications within their enterprises. The ability to leverage existing IT investments is important: Regardless of how compelling a .NET application's functionality is, senior management will probably be unwilling to write off an organization's investment in an expensive legacy database system. Instead of having to sell the advantages of a new technology, you now can show how Visual Studio .NET 2003 integrates with this legacy investment and provides new capabilities and technologies.


    DevConnections--Fall 2003 Dates Announced

    DevConnections = Microsoft ASP.NET Connections + Visual Studio Connections + SQL Server Magazine Connections.

    A few weeks ago you may have missed DevConnections Spring, which kicked off in New Orleans with three information-packed keynotes by Microsoft's Group Product Manager for .NET Tools and Services, David Lazar; ASP.NET Product Unit Manager Scott Guthrie (co-founder of the ASP.NET Team); and Director of SQL Server Product Management, Stan Sorenson.

    Now is the time to jump-start your fall 2003 training plans by securing your seat for DevConnections Fall, held Oct 13 - 15 in Palm Springs, CA. Register now to receive the lowest possible registration fee plus access to all three conferences for one low price. Call 800-438-6720 or 203-268-3204 for more information.

    http://www.devconnections.com

    2. Announcements
    (brought to you by Windows & .NET Magazine and its partners)

  • Cast Your Vote in Our Annual Readers' Choice Awards!

  • Which companies and products are the best on the market? Tell us by nominating your favorites in the annual Windows & .NET Magazine Readers' Choice Awards survey. Click here!

    http://www.winnetmag.com/readerschoice

  • Why Should You Register for SSMU E-Learning?

  • Our instructors make the difference--MVPs, MCT, and SQL Server gurus with real-life business application experience! Get 24/7 access to online archives! No time away from the office! Includes courseware and a real-time virtual lab! Affordable training--with preferred rates for SQL Server Magazine subscribers! The best online training is at

    http://www.sqlmag.com/ssmu

    3. Events
    (brought to you by Windows & .NET Magazine)

  • Security 2003 Road Show
  • Join Mark Minasi and Paul Thurrott as they deliver sound security advice at our popular Security 2003 Road Show event.

    http://www.winnetmag.com/roadshows/security2003

    4. New and Improved
    by Sue Cooper, [email protected]

  • Simplify Your Code Generation
  • Workstate Technologies released Codify 1.2, a code generation add-on for Visual Studio .NET that lets you eliminate tedious coding tasks, foster coding standards, and create generative programming tools. Features include CodeBuilders (multiple code generators), which you can embed within any source code file in your project to perform micro or macro code generation. You can edit the code-generation parameters either textually or visually. You can create or customize templates with the built-in template editor, which supports CodifyScript (similar to ASP.NET scripting) and Extensible Style Language Transformations (XSLT). Codify 1.2 is priced at $75 for a single-user license. Contact Workstate at 412-436-0603 or [email protected]

    http://www.workstate.com

    5. Contact Us

  • About Developer .NET Perspectives -- [email protected]
  • About the newsletter -- [email protected]
  • About technical questions -- http://www.winnetmag.com/forums
  • About product news -- [email protected]
  • About your subscription -- [email protected]
  • About sponsoring UPDATE -- [email protected]
  • This email newsletter is brought to you by Windows & .NET Magazine, the leading publication for IT professionals deploying Windows and related technologies. Subscribe today.

    http://www.winnetmag.com/sub.cfm?code=wswi201x1z

    Copyright 2003, Penton Media, Inc.

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