WinInfo Daily UPDATE, January 28, 2003

WinInfo Daily UPDATE—brought to you by Windows & .NET Magazine, the leading publication for IT professionals deploying Windows and related technologies.
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January 28, 2003—In this issue:

1. NEWS AND VIEWS

  • SQL Slammer Worm Hits Microsoft

2. ANNOUNCEMENT

  • Catch the Microsoft Mobility Tour—Time Is Running Out!

3. CONTACT US
See this section for a list of ways to contact us.

1. NEWS AND VIEWS
(contributed by Paul Thurrott, [email protected])

  • SQL SLAMMER WORM HITS MICROSOFT

  • Just a week after Microsoft celebrated the 1-year anniversary of its Trustworthy Computing initiative, one of the most virulent computer worms of all time hit the company. The so-called SQL Slammer worm, which is credited with bringing vast portions of the Internet to its knees over the weekend, targets a known Microsoft SQL Server 2000 security vulnerability that the company first fixed last summer. Although administrators might have been lax in applying the fixes, various groups are now complaining that Microsoft's fixes were difficult to install—so difficult, in fact, that the company didn't patch many of its own servers, which the worm subsequently infected.

    "We, like the rest of the industry, struggle to get 100 percent compliance with our patch management," said Microsoft spokesperson Rick Miller, who acknowledged that the worm affected many of the company's servers, including much of the MSN infrastructure, which was widely unavailable over the weekend. "We recognize—now more than ever—that this is something we need to work on. And, like the rest of the industry, we're working to fix it."

    Ironically, in a letter to customers last week, Microsoft Chairman and Chief Software Architect Bill Gates discussed Trustworthy Computing and the progress his company has made during the past year. He ended the letter with a list of things customers can do to help, and the first item was "stay up-to-date on patches." That advice is fairly obvious and something the company might take to heart itself.

    Since SQL Slammer hit, however, Microsoft has made it easier to patch SQL Server by using a standard executable update that doesn't require administrators to copy files manually, as earlier patches did. You can find the new SQL Slammer patch on Microsoft's Web site, or you can simply install SQL Server 2000 Service Pack 3 (SP3), which also patches the vulnerability.

    2. ANNOUNCEMENT
    (brought to you by Windows & .NET Magazine and its partners)

  • CATCH THE MICROSOFT MOBILITY TOUR—TIME IS RUNNING OUT!

  • This outstanding seven-city event will help you support your growing mobile workforce. Industry guru Paul Thurrott discusses the coolest mobility hardware solutions around, demonstrates how to increase the productivity of your "road warriors" with the unique features of Windows XP and Office XP, and much more. You could also win an HP iPAQ Pocket PC. There is no charge for these live events, but space is limited, so register today! Sponsored by Microsoft, HP, and Toshiba.

    3. CONTACT US
    Here's how to reach us with your comments and questions:

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