Moving SQL Server to a Virtual Platform

Moving SQL Server to a Virtual Platform

Learn about some of the main factors that impact SQL Server performance in a VM

Moving a physical SQL Server system to a virtual machine (VM) is fairly common these days and the majority of SQL Server instances do run in VMs. However, that wasn’t always the case. SQL Server and other relational database platforms are known to be very resource intensive and by their very nature VMs will have less processing power and memory than the physical hosts that they run on. Plus, there are many other differences between physical and virtual implementations. Even though there are a lot of SQL Server instances that are virtualized the various implementations are not always optimal.

SQL Server Virtualization Tips and Tricks

Some of the essential tips for successfully virtualizing SQL Server include:

  • Reserving memory for the virtualization host

  • Don’t over allocate physical cores

  • Don’t install SQL Server with the default configuration values

  • Separation of OS and SQL Server in separate VHDs or VMDKs

  • Placement of data and log files to separate VHD or storage locations

  • Placement of tempdb to separate VHD or storage locations

  • Using Dynamic memory

Learn more at IT/Dev Connections 2015!
You’ll be able to learn a lot more about running SQL Server on a virtual machine at this year’s IT/Dev Connections conference at the ARIA Resort in Las Vegas.  In his session Handle with Care: Virtual SQL Servers David Klee will provide practical hypervisor agnostic information about how to successfully virtualize SQL Server. David will dive into storage, interconnects, hypervisor VM, OS and SQL Server concerns. I will also be presenting Hyper-V Performance and Dynamic Memory where I cover Hyper-V specific performance factors. You can use the following discount code to get a cool $100 off your registration fee.

Discount code: ITDCOTEY15 ($100 off)

Register here: IT/Dev Connections 2015

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