A Patch for Upgrading from Preview Code

As promised, Microsoft has provided a free patch that lets preview code users retain their settings when they use the Windows 2000 (Win2K) Upgrade Edition. To download the Windows 2000 Evaluation Upgrade Utility patch, click here. After you run the patch, launch the Win2K Upgrade CD-ROM. Thanks to the Microsoft team for making this happen—and special thanks to Michael Linkey for verifying that the patch actually works!

Dual-Booting Windows 2000 Professional and Windows NT 4.0

For the past 10 days, I've had the frustrating experience of installing Windows 2000 Professional (Win2K Pro), installing Windows NT 4.0, reinstalling Win2K Pro, and reinstalling NT, ad infinitum. My problems are a side effect of some benchmark work I'm doing (you can read about that work in Windows 2000 Magazine later this year). In the meantime, here are some rules of thumb I've found to make your life a bit less miserable if you need to run NT 4.0 and Win2K Pro on the same system.

  1. Install NT first. Otherwise, your system can end up being unbootable. If you have to reinstall NT after installing Win2K Pro, the best method I've found is to boot from the NT distribution CD-ROM and use the partition options to erase existing partitions. Then create and format new partitions. Obviously, you should back up any crucial data first.
  2. Apply Service Pack 3 (SP3) or later for compatibility with the Win2K Pro boot process (SP5 or later is required for read-only compatibility with NTFS).
  3. Install Win2K. (If you have forgotten step 2, you'll be reminded.) You need to check the Advanced Options and indicate that you want the installation partition. Otherwise, your NT installation may be overwritten, which would send you back to step 1.

If you follow these rules, you'll minimize your frustration. (I'd like to say you'll eliminate your frustration, but that’s asking too much!)

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