JSI Tip 3214. How can I time my processes?


The Windows 2000 Resource Kits contain Ntimer.exe, which will time your applications and server processes. To use it:

ntimer \[-1 -f -s\] imageName \[parameters\]...

where:

-1 displays the minimum output and is the same as using no switches.

-f displays the process page faults, total system interrupts, context switches and system calls.

-s indicates the name of the image is a server process and requires pressing CTRL+C to get the times.

imageName \[parameters\] is the executable or script you want to time and any parameters the process may require.

Sample usage and output

C:\>ntimer -l test.bat

ContextSwitches - 3350
First level fills = 0
Second level fills = 0

ETime(   0:00:10.024 ) UTime(   0:00:00.010 ) KTime(   0:00:00.020 )
ITime(   0:00:09.984 )


C:\>ntimer -f test.bat

ContextSwitches - 3350
First level fills = 0
Second level fills = 0

ETime(   0:00:10.024 ) UTime(   0:00:00.010 ) KTime(   0:00:00.020 )
ITime(   0:00:09.984 )

Process PageFaultCount      263
Total Interrupts            1131
Total Context Switches      3350
Total System Calls          11177
where:

ETime is the elapsed time.

UTime is the time in User Mode.

KTime is the time in Kernel (Privileged) Mode.

ITime is idle time.

NOTE: All times are expressed in hours:minutes:seconds.milliseconds, but it is only accurate the the resolution of the timer, 10 milliseconds on x86 architecture.

NOTE: if you wish to record the time in a file:

C:\>ntimer -f test.bat > <Drive:>\Folder\test.log

              or

C:\>ntimer -f test.bat >> <Drive:>\Folder\test.log


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