Why Long-Term Application Commitments Are Key to Effectively Leveraging Converged Architecture

Why Long-Term Application Commitments Are Key to Effectively Leveraging Converged Architecture

Organizations need to decide carefully which applications to host on converged architecture, and one of the chief criteria should be length of time the company expects the application to be used—on premise.

Converged architecture is tied to workload in a way that general-purpose hardware is not. For this reason, organizations need to make sure that the workloads they intend to run on converged architecture will reside on premise for the foreseeable future, rather than being transitioned to the cloud during the next few years.

Vendors that sell converged architecture provide different versions based on the type of workload that the converged architecture will host—such as Exchange, SharePoint, virtualization or VDI workloads—and they configure the converged architecture system based on its workload. This is one of the key benefits of converged architecture: As any server administrator will tell you, the hardware characteristics that make an Exchange workload run well are different from the hardware characteristics that make a SharePoint deployment run well. For example, SharePoint does best with generous processor capacity, and Exchange benefits greatly from fast storage.

While a converged architecture system can host a different workload than the one it was optimized for, it won’t be working optimally. Organizations need to decide carefully which applications to host on converged architecture, and one of the chief criteria should be length of time the company expects the application to be used—on premise.

For example, an organization might be considering moving Exchange or SharePoint to the cloud by migrating to Office 365 in the next few years. If this type of move is under consideration, the organization should avoid purchasing a converged architecture system designed for these workloads and instead purchase more general-purpose hardware. The reality is that general-purpose, non-optimized hardware is likely to be cheaper than converged architecture. In addition, it can be repurposed to host other workloads once the original workloads no longer need to be hosted.

Underwritten by HPE

Part of HPE’s Power of One strategy, HPE Converged Architecture 700 delivers infrastructure as one integrated stack. HPE Converged Architecture 700 delivers proven, repeatable building blocks of infrastructure maintained by one management platform (HPE OneView), built and delivered exclusively by qualified HPE Channel Partners. This methodology saves considerable time and resources, compared to the do-it-yourself (DIY) approach.

Based on a complete HPE stack consisting of HPE BladeSystem with Intel® Xeon® E5 v3-based HPE ProLiant BL460c Gen9 blades, HPE 3PAR StoreServ all-flash storage, HPE Networking, and HPE OneView infrastructure management software, the HPE Converged Architecture 700 can be easily modified to fit within your existing IT environment.

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